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shifts
Med fasen rätt!
 
Inlägg: 11242
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Inläggav shifts » 2013-03-01 10:10

petersteindl skrev:Är det ingen annan än FoB som lyssnar på Spotify? 8)


Jo då!

Här är en lista med saker jag lyssnat mycket på den sista tiden:
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Tropic of Cancer - Permissions of Love: http://open.spotify.com/album/1BIPkh7EXjvxD73ydK35m7


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Vatican Shadow - Jordanian Descent: http://open.spotify.com/album/2armFdGbHpeHEitkwbTblo


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Bloom - Quartz: http://open.spotify.com/album/6KG5v1SshD3AFn61aI7Pio


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Time Attendant - Tournaments: http://open.spotify.com/album/2a9esAUIWaG5w5PF7udXfn


Min stora nya favorit är väl Raime:
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Raime - Raime EP: http://open.spotify.com/album/4k7rIsxydPnXfQFE6rIcCd

[img]http://hardwax.com/images/62498_01big.jpg[/http://hardwax.com/images/62498_01big.jpg[/img]
Raime - If Anywhere was here he would know where we are: http://open.spotify.com/album/1YExRP5RLk0lYPCFECLVBv


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Raime - Hennail: http://open.spotify.com/album/7or9QK64zcF1zzoNBigmg9
2021 maj på Spotify

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Koffe
Redaktör
 
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Inläggav Koffe » 2013-03-01 23:57


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shifts
Med fasen rätt!
 
Inlägg: 11242
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Inläggav shifts » 2013-03-09 11:28

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Momus - Ocky Milk

Har inte lyssnat så mycket på Momus innan, men har läst mycket om honom under en tioårsperiod. Nu när jag lyssnar på Ocky Milk från 2006 känns det en smula dumt att jag väntat så. Delar av skivan är rätt spretiga, men å andra sidan blir det inte särskilt tråkigt. 8O

Höjdpunkter för den som inte orkar ett album:
Hang Low
Nervous Hearthbeat
Pleasentness
2021 maj på Spotify

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shifts
Med fasen rätt!
 
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Inläggav shifts » 2013-03-19 08:41

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Atom™ - Pop HD. Uppföljare till coveralbumet Lassigue Bendthaus - Pop Artificielle. Som jag väntat!

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Woodkid - The golden age. Pop och bombastisk sådan.
2021 maj på Spotify

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FalloutBoy
Musiktipsens mästare
 
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-03-22 19:04

shifts skrev:Här är en lista med saker jag lyssnat mycket på den sista tiden:
Tropic of Cancer - Permissions of Love: http://open.spotify.com/album/1BIPkh7EXjvxD73ydK35m7

Vatican Shadow - Jordanian Descent: http://open.spotify.com/album/2armFdGbHpeHEitkwbTblo

Bloom - Quartz: http://open.spotify.com/album/6KG5v1SshD3AFn61aI7Pio

Time Attendant - Tournaments: http://open.spotify.com/album/2a9esAUIWaG5w5PF7udXfn

Min stora nya favorit är väl Raime:
Raime - Raime EP: http://open.spotify.com/album/4k7rIsxydPnXfQFE6rIcCd

Bra tips (som vanligt)! :D
Time Attendant hade jag missat, så tackar speciellt för det tipset.


shifts skrev:Atom™ - Pop HD. Uppföljare till coveralbumet Lassigue Bendthaus - Pop Artificielle. Som jag väntat!

Woodkid - The golden age. Pop och bombastisk sådan.

Två efterlängtade album! Kan bara instämma i rekommendationerna. 8)

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-03-22 19:09

Äntligen på Spotify! :

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Low - The Invisible Way (2013, Sub Pop)

The passage of time seems to be on Alan Sparhawk’s mind. On “Plastic Cup”—which opens Low’s 10th album, The Invisible Way—the singer-guitarist imagines a far-flung future where archeologists are digging up the ruins of America. They unearth a plastic cup once used to take a piss test and wonder if it might have been the chalice of a king. As Sparhawk unspools his absurd yet haunting premise—one with some curious religious undertones that may or may not have to do with his Mormon faith—he makes his acoustic guitar rustle like a nest of insects. In the background, singer-drummer Mimi Parker takes the high harmony (while cooing the word “high”) and lays down a skeletal beat that marks off seconds as well as centuries.

This year, Sparhawk and Parker celebrate their 20th anniversary—not as a married couple, although they are, but as the core of Low. Since forming in 1993, the band has had its ups and downs, although it’s never stooped to making a bad record. In fact, Low’s been on a roll since 2005’s The Great Destroyer, in which the band rebirthed itself as a bona fide rock trio. Sparhawk and Parker have never lost their signature sense of spaciousness and melancholy, though, even after losing longtime bassist Zak Sally immediately following The Great Destroyer. But there’s a neat loop formed by The Invisible Way. While calling back to the group’s roots as a slowcore pioneer, the disc is mostly an unplugged affair. And where recent albums dabbled in distortion and synthesizers, Invisible is all about acoustic guitar and piano.

It’s also about that singular, heart-stopping Low hush. “Amethyst” converts piano chords into soft, wet snowfalls, even as it lets single notes poke out like naked twigs. Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy produces Low for the first time here, and it can’t be a coincidence that there’s a marked, if stark, country-rock tint to Invisible. On “Holy Ghost,” Parker comes on like Emmylou Harris at her most wounded; “Clarence White” nostalgically pays homage to the late member of The Byrds (along with, weirdly, Charlton Heston). “Four Score” weaves a symphony out of whispers, while “Mother” twangs plainly and poignantly.

By the time a distorted guitar finally makes an appearance halfway through the disc’s penultimate song, “On My Own,” it doesn’t feel like an intrusion. Instead, it’s as if Low has taken its tried-and-true songwriting formula—a slow buildup into a smoldering climax—and stretched it to the length of an entire album. And an entirely superb one. If that’s a metaphor for longevity, so be it.
-- http://www.avclub.com/articles/low-the- ... way,93911/


http://open.spotify.com/album/4KEVn3WVx0bVJHpvumBeLl

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-03-22 19:22

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Phosphorescent - Muchacho (2013, Dead Oceans)

When Phosphorescent's Matthew Houck came off the road in support of his last album, 2010's Here's to Taking it Easy, he was mentally and physically exhausted, uncertain he wanted to make another Phosphorescent record. So he dispatched himself to Tulum, a small community in Mexico, where, he said, "I just checked out of my life for a while." As he took long solitary walks in the woods and swam, the pieces of what would become Muchacho began taking shape in his mind.

As with everything Houck does as Phosphorescent, from 2007's urban-rustic classic Pride to his 2009 Willie Nelson tribute record, this little story has an endearingly second-hand ring to it, as if Houck was obediently following the dictates of some dog-eared country-drifter playbook tucked in his back pocket. But this credulousness is also key to his music, which glows with simple reverence and purity. On Muchacho, Houck gathers together everything he's attempted-- beery, rollicking country-rock, haunted tribal hymnals, regret-soaked bar room heartbreak-- and fashions it into something close to a defining statement.

The first layer of Muchacho to savor is the simple gloriousness of its sound. Houck records his music largely alone, bringing in key players for individual parts but crafting the end results meticulously, in isolation. With the assistance of engineer John Agnello (Kurt Vile, Male Bonding), he has produced a bright, rich, warmly three-dimensional record, one that fuses the headed-for-the-big-city bar-rock signifiers of Here's to Taking it Easy with the night-sky awe of his earliest work. In fact, the album feels like a daylight version of Pride, a point hammered home by the contrast between that album's "Be Dark Night" and this one's two book-ending hymnals.

Accordingly, listening to Muchacho often feels like being warmed by afternoon sun as it floods your window. Every sound is lovingly recorded and given a cradle of space: The rounded pop of the drum track on "Terror in the Canyons (The Wounded Master)", paired with tumbles of upright piano and softly pattering bongos; the dryly whispering bowed harmonics that open "A Charm/A Blade"; the mournful little mariachi trumpet solo winding through the country waltz of "Down to Go". The first thing we hear on the record, introducing the opening "Sun" hymnal, is a dreamlike, welcoming major-key synth flutter. Those synths reappear on "Song For Zula", mingling with crystalline threads of pedal steel guitar, lifting country's signature instrument further heavenward.

At the center of all these majestic noises sits Houck himself. His voice is an unreliable instrument-- reedy, hiccuping, prone to cutting out entirely mid-note-- but he plies it heartbreakingly, never more than on Muchacho. On "Sun, Arise!" and "A New Anhedonia", he stacks himself into massed, keening layers, like a church full of choirboys. It’s a technique that he’s used before, but he has never sounded as overwhelming as he does here. The persistent catch in his voice, meanwhile gives him an unstable, baby chick fragility, magnifying the pathos of a line like, "See honey I am not some broken thing/ I do not lay here in the dark waiting for thee" from "Song For Zula".

One of Muchacho's main thematic concerns is redemption, and it’s one Houck explores with his customary ringing, allegorical language. Sometimes his writing grows so high-flown that it eludes sense: "I was the wounded master, and I was the slave… I was the holy lion, and I was the cage/ I was the bleeding actor, and I was the stage," he sings on "Terror in the Canyons (The Wounded Master)". More straightforward is this, from "Muchacho’s Tune": "See I was slow to understand/ This river’s bigger than I am/ It’s running faster than I can, though lord I tried." It’s a simple sentiment, pitched somewhere south of Zen koan and just north of heartland-rock cliche, and it maps out the coordinates of Houck’s world: It’s a place where well-worn sounds are the most beloved, where ideas and poses are settled into like old chairs. On Muchacho, Houck invests this world with new beauty and profundity.
-- http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/175 ... -muchacho/


http://open.spotify.com/album/2he3CA9Gg1XLCsBiMAaXiz

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shifts
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Inläggav shifts » 2013-04-05 12:49

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Mohammad - Som Sakrifis

Det bästa jag hört på otroligt länge. Cellodrone, med rötter i La Monte Young och Elaine Radigue.
2021 maj på Spotify

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-04-13 14:42

shifts skrev:Mohammad - Som Sakrifis

Det bästa jag hört på otroligt länge. Cellodrone, med rötter i La Monte Young och Elaine Radigue.

Lät riktigt trevligt! Tack för tipset! :D

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-04-13 14:50

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Mark Templeton - Jealous Heart (2013, Under The Spire)

Looking at the cover image for Jealous Heart – Mark Templeton’s first new album since his 2011 CD for Mort aux Vaches – you’d be forgiven for expecting something along the lines of Barn Owl’s expansive desert drones, Fabio Orsi’s crackling Alan Lomax homages or even William Fowler Collins’s pitch black country horror. The old sepia picture of a woman and her child on horseback is starkly framed, as though she is being spied on through a tattered flap of sacking by an amorous admirer, or about to be violently accosted by one of Cormac McCarthy’s bumpkin ne’er-do-wells. Bearing in mind Templeton’s serpentine trajectory since 2005′s Standing on a Hummingbird it would surprise few if he had actually ‘gone country’, but the music on Jealous Heart is far removed from his early excursions into pastoral ambience which did actually involve a little bit of banjo. It is hard to come up with a more fitting description of the music on Jealous Heart than Ezekiel Honig’s in the album’s press release. Honig knows this music as well as anyone having released the past four Templeton albums on his Anticipate label, and he uses the image of a ‘jazz club under the sea’ to nail the overriding atmosphere of this one.

The relatively up front nature of the manipulated vocal loops on Buffalo Coulee and Kingdom Key will strike listeners familiar with Templeton’s work first and foremost. Like Leyland Kirby before him, Templeton uses old vinyl to provide a haunted quality; the horns are buried deep beneath layers of silt and any pulse that may become evident sounds as though it’s emerging from bursting bubbles. Only during Once Were Down and the closing Straits are the horns allowed to emerge from the fog with any real clarity and the latter eventually breaks down to reveal the workings behind the entire album like the back of a grandfather clock being flipped open. Certainly there is far more detail to Jealous Heart than might be immediately apparent. Whereas Kirby’s music provides an everlasting tide of time it proves hopeless to try and swim against, Templeton makes sure there is enough variety in these relatively short pieces to maintain interest and reward any number of repeat listens. All manner of sonic clutter is thrown into the mix, with wooden knocks and metallic clangs ticking away beneath most of the record. Jealous Horse, for example, skits by on a series of wire-end fizzes and backwards vinyl scrapes, Sinking Heart introduces a repetitive piano phrase and – for the one time the album gets properly ‘out there’ – Carved and Cared For features a quite frightening squeal of rewound tape that sounds like a mutant baby being tickled. But nothing here is ever forced – Templeton trusts the listener’s patience enough to allow things to come through slowly and organically, and the outcome is surprisingly warm.

Although Jealous Heart represents another left turn for the restless Templeton, a nascent familiarity is still achieved through the album’s sewing box aesthetic. What Jealous Heart proves is that in the right hands these disparate elements can be combined in such magical ways as to result in something we recognise, and the more I listen, the clearer it all becomes; the subaquatic jazz club is certainly not one that is drowning – it is being conjured triumphantly to the surface with every single spin.
-- http://www.fluid-radio.co.uk/2013/02/ma ... ous-heart/


http://open.spotify.com/album/40GdUnp1xCKVcmdpW42YFx

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phloam
redaktör / tetra
 
Inlägg: 16078
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Ort: Stora Mellby

Inläggav phloam » 2013-05-11 01:55

Mark Templeton - skumt.... gillas 8) :)

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2-ch
 
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Inläggav 2-ch » 2013-07-01 10:11

Mest läggs här ut hela skivor eller enskilda låtar.
Jag smackar på med min spellista för musik av akustik karaktär.

http://open.spotify.com/user/gillestugan/playlist/6GOnfxqFVNUvYynWjtdBQv

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-07-05 20:56

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Solar Year – Waverly (2013, Splendour)

When Solar Year first released Waverly last June, they played hosts to a special pool party where underwater speakers released waves of their fluid, ambient 80s/electro sound collages to those brave enough to swim in a potentially dirty, communal tub. The immersive aquatic experience quickly informed us that the Montreal duo of Ben Borden and David Ertel seem to have a knack for creating atmospheric music that liberates the unconscious and celebrates terrestrial non-sequiturs.

For the album’s re-release, Borden and Ertel have revamped and re-mastered their original output with some new tracks, including Arbutus Records label mate Grimes lending her vocals on ‘Brotherhood’. The result is a spell-binding exploration into the throbbing melodic changes of Western religious and Gregorian choral music, 80s new wave and 4AD gloom pop with sharply pointed production – ‘psalmgaze’ if you want a label. Their label, not ours.

Solar Year have crafted a mysterious analogue persona for their band. Waverly distinctly celebrates ecclesiastical musical theory, the natural elements, and sacred spaces, set to a soundtrack of dreamy, electro-tinged pop. The band’s razor-sharp vision produces an intensity that’s difficult to extract yourself from, especially after the opener ‘Currents’. With Ertel’s fluid, heavily treated vocals and spacious production leading the way, Waverly is innovative, uplifting album, full of tension, subtle melodies and academic introspections into disparate genres of music. Traditional sounds are refracted and produced by experimental collaging that imbues tracks with way too many layers to count. While ‘Lines’ works with staccato, fractured bass synth rhythms, ‘Seeing The Same Thing’ pushes break-beats even farther to create a wide, spacious noise that fills the room. The entire LP is embedded with an architectural expansiveness, which is probably due to the fact that Solar Year recorded the album in a Buckminster Fuller-esque church.

Pitch-shifted vocals give all tracks a new mystic spiritualism, especially on ‘Abby & Amber’ where tinges of contemporary female vocalists, such as Julianna Barwick and Chelsea Wolfe, are referenced. Grimes inflects some vocals on ‘Brotherhood’ which, when paired with Ertel’s voice, creates a sombre, prophetic chorale experience. You and I never sang this kind of music at church – nor did any choir, for that matter.

When asked in a recent interview what image best represents the bands dynamic, Solar Year produced an anthropological diagram of opposing forces. Waverly is just that: a study of tension, mysticism and some natural elements thrown in for good measure. It will be interesting to see how the duo composes the live iteration of the album, and we expect some pretty arresting visuals to take centre stage. If you didn’t catch Solar Year poolside last year, put this record on at bath time and allow yourself to become fully submersed in their nebulous aural galaxy.
-- http://www.thelineofbestfit.com/reviews ... rly-128655


http://open.spotify.com/album/1yl1WUmyds5TGvtrv58xZn

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phloam
redaktör / tetra
 
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Ort: Stora Mellby

Inläggav phloam » 2013-07-26 02:08

Burhan Öcal, Pete Namlook - Sultan
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Som alltid suggestiv ambience, som en ökennatt med demoniska statyer djupt under den varma sanden. Fräckt!

http://open.spotify.com/track/1H6cGd2cgILOOJ2LPKIXyH - Bölüm 5

http://open.spotify.com/track/3QRSLdAkQRFsBksZgREyTV - Bölüm 7

http://open.spotify.com/track/0XJ0JII6oCPG11g96BCYfR - - Bölüm 8

http://open.spotify.com/track/2VjsCRRhRAz8elueu67sp2 - Gel Gör Ben Ask Neyledi

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zidanefromhell
 
Inlägg: 468
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Inläggav zidanefromhell » 2013-09-09 11:16

Mark kozelek & desertshore

http://open.spotify.com/album/1RY1NjOuYlpodtc2YT6h90


Mark är sig lik och gör inte mig besviken iaf :)
"stewie just said that!"

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zidanefromhell
 
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Inläggav zidanefromhell » 2013-09-10 10:38

Neko Case är tillbaka med något av det bästa hon gjort.

http://open.spotify.com/album/1lZeuZHmv7Mzngg8UEIRPo
"stewie just said that!"

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-22 18:28

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Tim Hecker - Virgins (2013, Kranky)

Tim Hecker’s first album under his own name was called Haunt Me, Haunt Me, Do It Again. This was 2001: Ambient and electronic music was still ruled by the penetrating austerity of labels like Mille Plateaux and Raster-Noton—labels whose artists strove to make their music sound as digital as possible. Markus Popp's Oval, which inspired a lot of supposedly funny comments about whether or not its CDs were skipping, is still probably the best example of this—and in an era where CDs are starting to go the way of the public pay phone, probably the most quaint, too.

From its title down, Haunt Me presented a model of electronic music that was spectral, imperfect, and capable of erosion. The most applicable metaphors for it weren’t technological, but natural: Parts of the album sounded like the slow tearing of paper, other parts like wind blowing across infinities of sand. Hecker didn’t just imbue his computers with “warmth”—a lazy term that has long needed to be put down—but with mortality. (Remember that that this was 2001, a year after the Y2K scare made supposedly infallible stores of digital information look vulnerable in a very human way.) At the time, Haunt Me’s most obvious companion was Fennesz’s Endless Summer, a grainy, blissful album that resembles easy-listening music coming through on the broken broadcast of a distant star.

Hecker has more or less followed course for the past 12 years, releasing high-quality albums with the low-key consistency of someone apparently unconcerned with trend. His approach to sound and texture can be traced to mid-2000s Radiohead, the ominous holding patterns of Godspeed You! Black Emperor (fellow Canadians with which Hecker has toured), William Basinski’s The Disintegration Loops, and basically any music that sounds like it has been abandoned by its maker to rot. His peaks are arguable: My favorites are 2006’s Harmony in Ultraviolet (his most conventionally beautiful) and 2011’s Ravedeath, 1972, which was built out of a single session of live organ, piano and guitar, recorded in an Icelandic church, and later worked over in the studio.

Virgins is the first Tim Hecker album more focused on performance than process. Most of it was recorded with a small group of orchestral musicians affiliated with Bedroom Community, the collective that also includes composers Nico Muhly, Ben Frost, Valgeir Sigurðsson and Paul Corley. (Frost helped record Ravedeath; Paul Corley engineered both Ravedeath and Virgins, and co-produced Oneohtrix Point Never’s R Plus Seven at Bedroom Community’s Greenhouse Studios in Reykjavik; Oneohtrix Point Never’s Dan Lopatin collaborated with Hecker on 2011’s Instrumental Tourist: The world of forward-thinking electro-acoustic music is a small and fraternal one.)

The live-room conceit is an interesting turn for an artist who for a long time worked in a primarily digital realm: Rather than having the music conjure a space, the space now shapes the music—a return to idea of sound as something that exists in the air before on hard drives, and of albums as specific records of specific people in specific places. Even the electronics—and there are still plenty of electronics—sound like they’re refracting and ricocheting off of wood and metal, scraping a ceiling, trying to find a way out.

Hecker’s music has always been eerie, but never this forceful. Some sections of Virgins feel like soundtracks for horror-movie climaxes when the camera fixes on a sickening image and refuses to turn away, fascinated and trapped at the same time. Even the album’s quieter moments are more tense than they might’ve been on Hecker’s earlier albums—a function, maybe, of a live-room environment where every creak and whisper seems to be happening a few feet from the speakers instead of at some artificially cavernous distance.

This is music that benefits from being heard loud and/or on headphones in the same way couches are best experienced by actually sitting down in them instead of just brushing your fingers against the upholstery as you leave the room. Like a lot of Ben Frost’s albums (or something like Swans’ The Seer), Virgins feels possessed by the idea that no advancements in society or technology will ever shake our primal reactions to fear, wonder, awe and what in a more naïve era used to be called the sublime. And while it’s a fallacy to think that hyperseriousness is the only way to strike people at their core, it’s still inspiring to hear an artist—especially one who started out as mellow as Hecker—double down and make a statement so confrontational. Once haunted, now he’s the one who haunts.
-- http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/185 ... r-virgins/


http://open.spotify.com/album/3GzIvKYXNOBViT8TveArjx

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FalloutBoy
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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-22 18:33

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Oneohtrix Point Never - R Plus Seven (2013, Warp Records)


There’s a continual tension in experimental electronic music between developing and owning a particular sound and exploring new ones. Creating a unique identity is difficult, and sometimes breaking out of it once it's been established is even harder. Daniel Lopatin of Oneohtrix Point Never is an artist working at one end of this spectrum. He’s restless, searching for new terrain, and his more recent full-lengths have found him reinventing himself with each new record. R Plus Seven, the follow-up to 2011’s Replica, sounds little like previous OPN releases. But despite the radical shifts—and this is what makes this project so consistently rewarding—you can still hear him in it; there are bedrock approaches and clear musical values that you can pick out as Lopatin.

The general approach on R Plus Seven is to build new music using the bright yet cold textures of the early age of personal computing. The aesthetic is identifiably “80s,” but it’s not the 80s of new wave, with its familiar array of synthesizers. Instead, Lopatin focuses on the hauntingly clean and clear pre-set sounds that were available for early, crude digital music production (and which were often used in commercial applications, from bumpers for local PBS shows to soundtracking instructional videos) and adds the kind of short-burst bits of information that were common when a sampler could hold two or three seconds of 8-bit audio. While this sort of throwback is common in electronic music, for Lopatin it serves a purpose beyond reference. R Plus Seven is aware of how music and textures like this are likely to be received, but it plays with our collective unconscious of music technology to develop something that comes off as strange and otherworldly and, most importantly, rich with feeling, despite the icy surface layer.

There’s a weird kind of innocence in this sound palette. The fake horns and whooshing vocal samples evoke a time when “the computer” as a concept was still very much rooted in the future rather than the present. The chintzy approximations of common instruments contain a sort of implicit critique of the idea that technology will save us all, but Lopatin’s music doesn’t get hung up on irony, even though it's definitely in the mix. It’s this quality, of highlighting the vacuous side of this music while simultaneously embracing its humor and poignancy, that elevates the OPN project to another plane.

Along those lines, during my first few listens to R Plus Seven, it was hard not to think of James Ferraro’s recent work in this area, specifically his album Far Side Virtual, which used the impossibly cheerful and polished sound of early digital culture to emphasize the music’s connection to mindless, friction-free commerce. To Ferraro’s credit, he’s kept a poker face when presenting this music, and you never quite knew where he was coming from, which made the listening experience fraught with ambiguity and anxiety. But Lopatin comes at it from another angle. He wants his music to do things that music is traditionally known to do: change, develop, use melody to convey feelings, build tension and then release it. That all of this happens within such tightly controlled parameters makes the fact that the record is emotionally engaging that much more impressive. Common sonic threads include wispy digitized voices on tracks like “Americans” and “Chrome Country” that bring to mind the then-exotic turn-of-the-80s sound of the Fairlight synthesizer, an early sampling device, along with many brittle digital versions of sounds that are distantly “exotic,” conveying the feel of a blocky pixilated representation of a jungle or beach scenes.

Indeed, with “Americans” and “Inside World”, the album makes sharp use of contrasts between the real and the virtual, between “natural” and the representation of natural. I’m tempted to call it Fifth World Music in homage to the 1980 John Hassel/Brian Eno album Fourth World: Possible Musics, a record that has a clear spiritual connection to this one. Hassel and Eno hoped to filter ancient tribal sounds through the sound of technology to create an alien but distantly familiar landscape (their project generated discussion about clumsy wording and potentially problematic ideas of what constituted “primitive” music, but that’s a subject for another time). Lopatin grapples with some of those ideas of decontextualization and colliding worlds, but the meeting place is closer to a tableau from Second Life, providing another layer of disorientation.

Still, I can’t underscore strongly enough that, as with Replica, all of this takes place in a realm where musicality is paramount. You don’t listen to this record thinking about theory; it’s beautiful stuff, with chords and tunes and sections you remember. And it also draws from more sounds and eras than I’ve given it credit for. Opening track “Boring Angel” seems a tribute to the glorious repetition of Terry Riley’s process music, while “Along” and “Cyro” are closer to the mood and structure of that place where late-90s IDM sounds met the winding structures of post-rock. R Plus Seven doesn’t have quite the disembodied weirdness of Replica, but it’s no less accomplished, another intriguing chapter from an artist whose work remains alive with possibility.
-- http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/185 ... lus-seven/


http://open.spotify.com/album/68PRq4zj7YXMwiUq6FNGvR

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-22 18:41

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Banabila & Machinefabriek - Travelog (2013, Tapu Records)

Travelog is a collection of ambient and atmospheric soundscapes mixed with emotion filled layers and recordings that tell stories only possible in this medium. Their vivid use of space sets the stage for a performance of a lifetime. When Michel Banabila and Rutger Zuydervelt (Machinefabriek) finished their first collaborative album, it felt like they were just getting started. Suprised by how fluent and natural their collaboration went, it was obvious that this wasn’t over yet. While the first release Banabila & Machinefabriek was quite an abstract affair, its successor Travelog is lighter, playful and rhythmic. Some moments might recall the mighty Tape, while others showcase motoric krautrock influences and subtle hints of African rhythms. All in all, this album clearly radiates the joy of its creative process and sees Banabila and Machinefabriek on the top of their game. Travelog comes housed in a full colour digipack, graced with photography by Michel Banabila, designed by Rutger Zuydervelt. It’s released by Tapu Records, in collaboration with Lumberton Trading Company.
-- http://soundcolourvibration.com/2013/08 ... -travelog/


http://open.spotify.com/album/65EMX9dwmnMUMtC1kVStlN

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shifts
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Inläggav shifts » 2013-10-22 19:08

Tim Hecker-skivan är svinbra. Oneohtrix nya är jag inte lika kompis med, men den har sina ljusa stunder. Machinefabriek-samarbetet lyssnade jag faktiskt lite på i går för första gången, men har inte bildat mig någon uppfattning ännu.

Kul att ha dig här igen!
2021 maj på Spotify

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-26 14:59

shifts skrev:Kul att ha dig här igen!

Kul att vara här igen. ;)
Ska försöka titta in lite oftare.

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-26 15:07

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36 - Shadow Play (2013, 3six Recordings)

It’s funny how, when we actually take a long, hard look at our lives, how much there is that is outside of our control; I think we like to fool ourselves as to how much influence we actually have on the things we do and the things we care about but the reality is that, like shadows, we are controlled by external factors, each one driving us and manipulating us in some way. With that in mind, let us now enter the world that 36 has created on this, his most mature and intelligent album to date.

Opener and title track “Shadow Play” brings forth a Drone sound somewhat unlike anything he’s produced before now, with the possible exception of “Saphron”. These thick, faux-string drones are not the dark and oppressive tracks we heard on Hollow or Lithea, they’re practically optimistic and yearning, if a little excessive at over 9 minutes long. There are still whispers of his old work coming through in the minimal vocals and delicate bleeps but something just doesn’t quite sit well with me; it feels like Uncanny Valley territory as it approaches the familiar but is just different enough to make it strange.

But then the beautiful sadness of “Ofelia” chases it up and we’re plunged right back into nostalgia as the fugue descends and a much more serene and clouded drone fog envelops us and tugs on the heart-strings, balancing quavering synths alongside the lo-fi drone haze. That helplessness certainly comes across strongly here, and the extended track length and repetition make it feel like there’s no end in sight. Yet there is always hope, always an opportunity to break free, something which the delicate “Dawnspace” offers us, quietly feeding buried snippets of birdsong and gently reassuring notes to soothe our troubled souls and blow away the darkness building up.

This streak of great tracks culminates in my personal favourite, and possible all time favourite 36 track, “Breathless”. It reminds me a little of “Shiny Tiny Stars” by Loveliescrushing in the manner which it introduces these pulses, these waves, of ambience towards the listener as well as the heavily obscured female vocal samples. Its tidal nature is paralysing in the same way that I can spend hours just watching the waves lap at the shore; always fundamentally the same but each time slightly different. “Ascension” is something of a curveball in the heart of the album, but a neat one at that; I believe this is actually a reference to the start of the game Bioshock: Infinite, both in the track title and the spoken words that close the piece: “Hallelujah”. Like the game it is a transcendental process; the quirky, grinding synths count down to the hard, juddering acceleration of the vast whining guitars that tear through the core of the track, but ultimately fading away as the atmosphere is abandoned and we see black in the cockpit window, propelling us away from the troubles in “the Sodom below”. It’s a surprising track, but a corker, 36 to the very end.

“Eclipse” comes in like some reappropriated “Arc” from Hollow, a shimmering wall of barely moving light that slowly but surely becomes corrupted by the darkness, a slowly encroaching wash of oscillating beats and a low fidelity fuzz that attempts to erode the purity and literal presence of the sunlight itself. Of course, this never truly happens, as the Moon only ever partially occludes the Sun but it is a shortlived event and once it’s over things simply return to their previous state having ridden through the threat of night in the day, of impending darkness and sadness.

Things start to get a little complicated as we approach the end; the mysteriously titled “Heather Spa” briefly flashes distant and almost indistinguishable sounds at us; at times like some bleary, smeared laughter, others like screams and shouts of a regrettable past made all the more poignant (and probable) by the surprisingly dominant violins. It’s a long piece, as many of them are on this record, and there is still something nagging at me that it’s a little overblown and unnecessarily exorbitant in length but the eerie peacefulness and carefully smothering audio keep us away from the fear and revolt lurking darkly below, and it’s captivating. Finally closer “Dangerous Days” serenades us out on antithetic beacons of shining drone that betray their namesake, once more following that trend of deception and carefully compensating or even completely covering up the true problems and misery.

What’s so unusual in regards to 36′s work is the extreme cohesion and truly thematic nature of Shadow Play; that’s not to say that Hypersona didnt have that child-like naivety or Hollow that dark homesickness, it’s just that they were a bit looser compositionally, with more experimentality and variability in the sounds presented. Shadow Play takes that feeling of uselessness and disconnection from reality and repurposes it, drowns it out and turns it around, and it’s charted perfectly throughout the record’s duration. Don’t be a shadow, letting your life get ruled and manipulated, become the manipulator and take it back, that’s the message here, and a clear one at that. Stunning.
-- http://hearfeel.wordpress.com/2013/07/2 ... play-2013/


http://open.spotify.com/album/1025Ub4NNYyge0eSInPlvp

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-10-26 15:24

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Chelsea Wolfe - Pain Is Beauty (2013, Sargent House)

The void is a place you might shy away from. But Chelsea Wolfe lives there, digging for all the melodies in the abyss. After an album she doesn’t want you to remember about was released, Wolfe took years off and redefined her musical career. Releasing The Grime and The Glow in 2010 welcomed a much darker and moodier vibe to a rewarding listen - one of the better and more underappreciated debuts of the past few years. Apokalypsis was an album more people paid attention to, matching more sinister vibes than her previous and reaching further into the heavier melodies. But last year’s Unknown Rooms: A Collection of Acoustic Songs showed Wolfe taking a reserved approach to her content, making tracks like “The Way We Used To” and “Flatlands” shining brightly instead of dimly.

But Pain Is Beauty towers over all of these. Her fourth album is the summation of all efforts and an impressive one at that. It’s emotionally draining and it’s cinematically shocking, at the very least. Conceptually binding an album isn’t such a new thing, but Wolfe does it with justice and with success, and Pain Is Beauty is one of those listens no one can forget. Throughout this album, there are moments of immense, breathtaking intensity worth delving into and revisiting for years to come. Not only is this a particularly great album, Pain Is Beauty is one of the more unique albums you’ll listen to this year.

One characteristic of her earlier albums is the sheer amount of layers of music. Everything is delicately placed on a platter to showcase the right amount of emotion. In many ways, this is a main characteristic of Pain Is Beauty - the tiniest noises bring you further into the mix, noticing its every detail. All of this sits beautifully in the background, with Chelsea Wolfe’s voice - wounded, heartbreaking, and sharp as a knife - leading the song, with her own voice as an instrument. She deliberately affects her voice with pedals - obscuring her own voice in the darkness - and hits high notes with unyielding intensity that pierces your soul.

Wolfe, along with multi-instrumentalist Ben Chisholm, utilized darker synthetic sounds on many tracks, including lead single “The Warden,” which reimagines the ending to George Orwell’s 1984 and touches on one of the larger themes on the album - love. These evocative and urgent sounds are executed much more prominently and successfully than previous efforts, but do not rule the album’s soundscape. Tracks like “We Hit A Wall” and “They’ll Clap When You’re Gone” are sinister doom in music form, with earth-shattering, heavy, thick, and deep guitars that rumble your mind.

Pain Is Beauty is a complex behemoth. It is filled with primal screams, topical journeys, and romantic statements. Rich in musical variety, “Destruction Makes The World Burn Brighter” has a serpentine-like structure, channeling Joy Division to a certain extent. It’s also one of the better song titles in recent memory. Ambient tracks like “Sick” and “Reins” apply repetition to the max, bringing an utmost haunting tone to these two. The last four tracks are truly various. “Ancestors, The Ancients” is a darkly, synthy, and subtle cut, while “They’ll Clap When You’re Gone” pulls out the guitar for a jangly, acoustic tale. This one has Wolfe singing, “When can I die? / When can I go? // When will I be free? / When will I know?” Beyond the stark depressive nature, Wolfe mystically pleads for answers through dazzling chants.

“The Waves Have Come” is the album’s climax, jarringly putting together a tale about a man who’s about to be swallowed in a tsunami. Tapping at virtually two keys on a piano throughout, the track swells and swells until the ultimate crash wipes away everything you’ve heard up to this point, washing away everything you know. This eight-minute goliath is the zenith of the album, flying to all new plateaus seen thus far, with bleeding strings and Wolfe’s vocals delivering heavenly notes above the layers upon layers of instrumentation. The outro has Wolfe crying vocally, “The waves have come and taken you to sea / Never to return to me / Never to return to me / Never to return to me.” Ultimately, the bleak outro of slowly drawing out the climactic finish is a resounding and cleansing feeling. Chelsea Wolfe spoke about Pain Is Beauty, explaining that the album gave a healing impression. “The Waves Have Come” and the defining outro “Lone” wrap up the album to give it a very healing ending, after the onslaught of doom, intensity, and emotion.

Pain Is Beauty shocks. It loudly proclaims its motives from the very start and explores melodies for the duration of the album. Music doesn’t find very many visionaries anymore, and Chelsea Wolfe brands her darkly emotive music as an artistic representation of herself. Sculpting the greatest sum of tracks Wolfe has ever created, Pain Is Beauty, shines in the void that she dwells in. Bleak, distant, polarizing, and beautiful, Wolfe’s fourth album makes a gargantuan impact.
-- http://www.prefixmag.com/reviews/chelse ... uty/74838/


http://open.spotify.com/album/4rpm9Ez8nfVsQvNmHDbgyp

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-11-08 23:52

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Compound Eye - Journey from Anywhere (2013, Editions Mego)

Journey from Anywhere' is a near-narcotic collection of electronic improvisations by former Coil participant Drew McDowall and current Psychic Ills/Messages man, Tres Warren. It's the follow-up to their 'Origin of Silence' art edition for The Spring Press and follows its themes of patiently explorative, unfolding composition in eight parts working at a "trasportive blur of dark psychedelic minimalism." The dissonant tang of Coil's furthest occult chicanery is clear and present and a beacon for all keener psychonauts throughout the album, at best in the two extended centrepieces of sustained, almost bagpipe-like drone, 'Archaic Atmosphere' and 'Journey Into Anywhere' whilst the shorter sections immerse us in bleakly detached zones with the astral stare case trudge of 'The Hydraulic Regime Vibrates From Within' and 'Cosmic Exhaust: The Selectro (Cut-up composition)'. However, most effective are the rabbit-hole plunge of 'Cosmic Exhaust: The Selector (Cut-up composition)', and the creeping intensity of 'The Outer Sphere' with its shivering nitrous oxide delays and wheezing drones primed for anyone with a cannister and no dispenser to get their fix.
-- http://boomkat.com/vinyl/809475-compoun ... m-anywhere


http://open.spotify.com/album/2E0QiVSxI7BO8XD6eyEsLk

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Inläggav Koffe » 2013-12-01 12:21

Visst har jag skrivit om The Wailin' Jennys förut? Det har jag nog. Men detta är något speciellt. Magiskt. Ni får inte missa denna:
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Live at the Mauch Chunk Opera House

Jag är väldigt förtjust i live och bootlegs och detta är exceptionellt. Magi i form av bitar. Folk och Small Town America när det är som bäst. Magisk musik, magiskt ljud. Sur-öl och rutiga skjortor. Vackert. Yeah!

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Dyrka!

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phloam
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Inläggav phloam » 2013-12-02 01:38

Ibland blir man så glad när man råkar klicka på spår som visar sig vara precis vad man behöver:

Den uppenbarligen superba samlingen "Carry on, pretend were not in the room" av/med Efdemin:
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.... så hittar jag elektronisk lycka i form av spåren "Floorshow 1.2" med Surgeon
http://open.spotify.com/track/7A9zgrRTKnoEjR6GQVQozk

(a.k.a. DJ Surgeon) och även underbar elektrohouse med Stephan Greider och The Persuader - "Kaos".



Och då har jag bara klickat på två av spåren på samlingen och redan hittat två favoriter :D


Hela samlingen i en enda mix!!!!
http://open.spotify.com/track/4r3NSfFXLdmTu5TDTETXF2


......och Photek!! sista spåret, T' Raenon är balsam för själen :) :) :)
http://open.spotify.com/track/5VRzOzUKsTvjo6IWVuzJ47

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-12-11 20:17

phloam skrev:Ibland blir man så glad när man råkar klicka på spår som visar sig vara precis vad man behöver:

Den uppenbarligen superba samlingen "Carry on, pretend were not in the room" av/med Efdemin:


Photek-spåret var trevligt!
Tack för tipset! 8)

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-12-11 21:07

Koffe skrev:Visst har jag skrivit om The Wailin' Jennys förut? Det har jag nog. Men detta är något speciellt. Magiskt. Ni får inte missa denna:

Har missat dem, så jag får väl se till att lyssna på dem nu då. ;)

Kul att se dig här också! Det är allt för sällan du tittar in. :(
Passar därför på att tipsa om något jag misstänker kan vara något för dig (om du inte redan känner till dem då). :

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Lily & Madeleine - Lily & Madeleine (2013, Asthmatic Kitty Records)

Some of the best music comes from musicians who met each other on a whim, forming iconic bands after just a jam session or two. On the other hand, having shared time and experiences over the course of years can also lead musicians to form a bond that goes beyond the music. To say that today’s daily album comes from the latter of these two would be an understatement; sixteen year-old Lily Jurkiewicz and her eighteen year-old sister, Madeleine have been together forever, or at least as long as they can remember. The two have been on a whirlwind ride, touring around the world in anticipation of the release of their self-titled debut LP.

The music of Lily & Madeleine has captivated listeners since the two began making their musical forays public just about a year ago. Flawless, angelic, and beautiful are just a few of the common descriptors for the voices of these young ladies. The first Youtube video the pair released, “In The Middle” showed the girls the power of virality, earning over 330k views to date. The video is rather poetic — it’s hard to believe such aged, ethereal voices are coming from this pair of young, slightly disinterested girls. But the power of the song, the emotion and musical intricacies packed into two minutes.

“In The Middle” is one of five tracks from the pair’s very successful debut EP, The Weight of the Globe, available on iTunes. Still, fans and critics alike knew that the EP was only the beginning for this talented duo. And now, here we are, ten months later, and the girls have answered the call of their followers, releasing a full, twelve track self-titled album. And they do not disappoint.

The album opens with “Sounds Like Somewhere”, a somber, longing tune that draws heavily on the country influences that manage to sneak their way into Indiana via Kentucky. The Jurkiewicz sisters seem to channel muses that Stevie Nicks may have befriended a few decades past. The soft strings add a thematic element to the song, giving the track an atmospheric quality that goes beyond some of L&M’s strum-and-sing acoustic works; it’s a nice touch that reflects the more polished approach to this album. “Devil We Know” follows, and with its quiet instrumentation, the lyrics (and their delivery) shine in the forefront of this track. The liner notes hint at this concept, but it’s as if the shades of distinction between the shared experiences of these two girls are reflected in their harmonies, which are simply unreal.

“Spirited Away” is a mysterious song, utilizing a repetitive structure throughout the verses that quickly becomes hypnotic. The lyrics are no less enigmatic; the sisters speak of musical shadows, dancing in a ballet, and before the two are spirited away, they ask: who haunts you? I would be surprised if the title is not in some way a reference to Hayao Miyazaki’s animated classic Spirited Away, but I also can’t say that I completely understand the reference. The coming-of-age film tackles themes of separation and loss, and in this sense, it may have served as an inspiration, but who can say beyond the Jurkiewicz sisters…”Disappointing Heart” features an awesome progression that sounds a bit like this Radiohead classic, which in turn, sounded a bit like this Beatles hit. The song is eerily honest and unforgiving, revealing another side of Lily & Madeleine’s repertoire.

“Come To Me” is the album’s official featured track, and the girls shot an accompanying video that casts a dark, dreamy haze over the entire song. The lyrics tackle ideas of abandonment and return, of space and loss, and the video ends up producing more questions than answers. It’s a thought-provoking piece, and is sure to bewilder listeners for a bit.

L&M take things back to the 50s and 60s with the melancholy harmonies they belt out in “Paradise”. The country pop that gained momentum in the era has obviously had its influence on these girls, and this one sounds like a modern day Patsy Cline. Where these two found their timing and ideas about harmony are beyond me. Further, that these two are discovering so much talent within themselves in their youth simply adds to their mystique, and it seems as though they aim to take advantage of this.

Lily & Madeleine is a dozen tracks that have all the whimsical heart of music that was made decades ago. The Jurkiewicz sisters have discovered themselves with this album. As they push into the world of popular music, they do so in many directions, but at the center is a pair of tightly-bound individuals who seem bent on staying true to themselves. This album is but a glimpse into the curious world that these two have found. Pick it up at one of the outlets below.
-- http://thedailyalbum.com/lily-madeleine-lily-madeleine/


http://open.spotify.com/album/4bVdmAXnj56vuNRCGAoO6O

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phloam
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Inläggav phloam » 2013-12-11 21:15

FalloutBoy skrev:Kul att se dig här också! Det är allt för sällan du tittar in. :(


+1 Hej Koffe :D Tack för en bra tråd! Tack själv FB för alla bra tips och God Jul på er allihopa :)

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Inläggav FalloutBoy » 2013-12-11 22:10

phloam skrev:+1 Hej Koffe :D Tack för en bra tråd! Tack själv FB för alla bra tips och God Jul på er allihopa :)

Detsamma! :)

Slänger in lite elektronisk musik när jag ändå håller på. ;) :

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Senking - Capsize Recovery (2013, Raster-Noton)

Outstanding long-player for all fans of darkside post-techno sound design: Raster Noton's bleakest bot Jens Massel aka Senking follows the trajectory of his 'List' and 'Pong' classics into the abyssal depths of 'Capsize Recovery'; a tortuous journey through eight intense, lightless levels of droning bass, buffeting synthlines and coruscating beats emulating the effect of being locked in a Russian submersible/spacecraft 20000 leagues below/above the sea and far from land. The whole album was recorded sans computer, which makes the sense of spatial dynamic even more remarkable, working in a simulated space somewhere between the illusory architextures of Raime & Powell, and the vast electro-acoustic parameters of Emptyset. Similarly to Raime, he's also honed his halfstep rhythms to a stomach -wrechingly powerful movement, adopting the dynamics of UK-borne halfstep far more concisely than many of his German contemporaries, especially in the glinting roil of opener, 'Chainsawfish', the sepulchral cadence of 'Tiefenstop' or the SP:MC-alike junglist splices of 'Shading' and 'Capsize Recovery'. However, if we've any gripes with his sound, it's that verges perhaps too close to the gnarly rock chops of Distance at times, perhaps coming off like the EDM/rock soundtrack to a Vin Diesel blockbuster in 'Cornered', but it's a minor quibble, and unlikely to stop this becoming one of our favourite electronic albums this year.
-- http://boomkat.com/cds/790779-senking-capsize-recovery


http://open.spotify.com/album/44xUsD9iaOxn4WYBGbRm1z

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